Outreach continues during Covid-19

Outreach During The COVID Storm

Entomology’s outreach plans creatively evolved to accommodate the COVID-19 cancellation of all OSU in-person activities on March 16. Our outreach team, Denise Ellsworth, Jeni Ruisch, and Jeni Filbrun implemented successful dynamic and interactive online programs, while maintaining their high level of continuous care for our Columbus and Wooster Bug Zoos.

Ellsworth and Ruisch each swiftly modified in-person conferences, workshops, classroom visits, camp curriculums, on-going pollinator program activities, small-group sessions – everything- to provide online content delivery. Entomology’s interactive engagement within our communities continue and thrive, as evidenced by the impressive number of attendees in these online programs.

Adapting to COVID-19 restrictions, Ellsworth and Entomology alumni, MaLisa Spring, coordinated and implemented The Ohio Bee Survey, a new community science project to create a detailed inventory of Ohio’s wild bees.

Meanwhile, Filbrun is consumed with the creation, design, permitting and move logistics for our new Bug Zoo in Wooster, as well as the continuous care of BugZooWoo’s large and diverse collection of live arthropods.

As for the Columbus BugZoo – Ruisch has it under constant supervision in her dining room, all 40 species!

Detailed updates and summaries of the incredible activities listed below are available on our Outreach page:

Ellsworth: Pollinator Education

Filbrun: Wooster Bug Zoo transformation

Ruisch: Columbus BugZoo & Outreach

  • BugZoo's temporary new home
  • Outreach by ZoomTemporary Home of Columbus Bug Zoo

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  1. Artist's rendering of future science building

    Help Support BugZooWoo!

    Sep 14, 2020

    We are so happy to have raised more than $10,000! We are even more pleased to announce that United Titanium Inc., located in Wooster, Ohio, has matched our first $10,000 in donations! Additionally, the company is challenging us to raise ANOTHER $10,000 through the end of the campaign-- which it will match with an additional $10,000!

    Please share our fundraiser with your friends and family and accept our heart-felt gratitude for all your generosity and support!

    https://buckeyefunder.osu.edu/project/21788

     

  2. Outreach continues during Covid-19

    Jul 15, 2020

    Entomology’s outreach plans creatively evolved to accommodate the COVID-19 cancellation of all OSU in-person activities on March 16. Our outreach team, Denise Ellsworth, Jeni Ruisch, and Jeni Filbrun implemented successful dynamic and interactive online programs, while maintaining their high level of continuous care for our Columbus and Wooster Bug Zoos.

  3. lawn weeds

    New OSU Citizen Science Program for Youth (3rd – 7th grade): Dandelion Detectives!

    May 31, 2019

    The Gardiner Lab at The Ohio State University is developing a youth-focused citizen science program called Dandelion Detectives. The lab is seeking individuals, school groups, and other youth organizations to participate in this collaborative project! Dandelion Detectives aims to measure the value of lawn weeds for bees and other insects by having school age kids (targeting 3-7th graders) monitor an “Observation Dandelion” and collect data about the richness of blooming weeds (or lack thereof) found in their yard. Dandelion Detectives will take place over the summer of 2020 and is open to anyone who has access to a yard.

  4. Megan Meuti Receives Entomological Society of America Early Career Professional Teaching Award

    Aug 22, 2018

    The ESA Early Career Protessional Teaching Award is given to a student transition or early professional who excels in entomological education.

  5. Fragrant Madagascan Plant Holds Promise as a Mosquito Fighter

    Aug 22, 2018

    WOOSTER, Ohio — Scientists at The Ohio State University have successfully tested a new chemical to control mosquitoes, including the ones that spread Zika, and it comes from a traditional medicinal plant found only in Madagascar. Full article here.

  6. Protecting Pollinators from Pesticides, webinar with Elizabeth Long

    Aug 21, 2018

    In this webinar, Elizabeth Long provides a brief overview of the factors that influence pesticide exposure risks for beneficial insects across the landscape. She summarizes current knowledge of the different routes of pesticide exposure for pollinators, discusses the research methods used to identify these risks, and highlights steps we can take to promote and protect pollinators in our home, urban, and agricultural landscapes.

  7. Dave Shetlar, "The Bug Doc," visits Good Day Columbus to talk bugs.

    Aug 21, 2018

    Dr. David Shetlar stopped by Good Day Columbus to talk about the bugs making a comeback this fall, and how you can try to stop them from taking over your home (August, 2018).

  8. Department Student Award Winners

    Aug 17, 2018

    Please join us in congratulating this year’s graduate student award winners.  These students, as well as the winners of the spring DeLong competition, were recognized at the department's summer recognition event. Congratulations to all of our award winners and kudos to everybody who competed!

    2018 Susan W. Fisher Teaching Award                     James Radl

    2018 David J. Horn Service Award                           Yvan Delgado de la Flor

    2018 Lowell R. “Skip” Nault Research Award          Ashley Yates

  9. Entomology research featured in Cleveland event

    Aug 22, 2017

    Research underway in Cleveland by graduate student Denisha Parker, undergraduate Ryan Byler, and entomologist Mary Gardiner was featured in the city's ciCLEvia event July 16.

    In its second year, ciCLEvia is an open streets movement that periodically closes down sections of the city to motorists and opens it to everything from yoga to cycling to giant Jenga games and hula hooping. 

  10. Insecticide Can Hamper Yield Increase from Bees in Soybeans (Bee Culture magazine)

    Aug 17, 2016

    Although soybean aphids remain at low levels, Reed Johnson and Andy Michel, two Ohio State University researchers are concerned that many growers are going to add insecticides to spray tanks when applying fungicides.

    “Well, I’m going over the field anyway so I thought I’d add an insecticide for insurance purposes! The insecticide is relatively cheap and soybeans are worth so much!” is what researchers say they hear from farmers this time of year.

    The researchers are clear that they do not recommend this practice, and feel an IPM approach is much better for everyone and everything, including the environment. They do not recommend an insecticide application unless there is a need.

     

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